Pupil Premium 2021

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement –  

The Rodillian Academy 2021/22 – 2024/25 

This statement details our school’s use of Pupil Premium funding (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.  

It outlines our Pupil Premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of Pupil Premium had within our school.  

School Overview 

Detail  Data 
School name  The Rodillian Academy 
Number of pupils in school   1613 
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils  23.5% 
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers   2021/22 – 2024/25 
Date this statement was published  31.12.2021 
Date on which it will be reviewed  31.12.2022 
Statement authorised by  Lorraine Bradley, 

Principal 

Pupil Premium lead  Danielle Williams, Deputy Headteacher  

Racheal Dean, Assistant Headteacher 

Governor / Trustee lead  John Hirst, Chair, Rodillian LRB 

Funding Overview 

Detail  Amount 
Pupil Premium funding allocation this academic year  £312,505 
Recovery Premium funding allocation this academic year  £50, 000 
Pupil Premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)  £Nil 
Total budget for this academic year 

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year 

£ 362, 505 

Part A: Pupil Premium Strategy Plan 

Statement of Intent 

At The Rodillian Academy our Pupil Premium strategy aims to deliver support to disadvantaged students in an integrated and targeted way, to ensure that students receive the opportunity for additional support and access to learning opportunities they require to make substantial progress.  

 

We have chosen a classroom and intervention-based approach which research has shown works best. The progress of students in receipt of this funding is monitored throughout the year at each assessment point and the strategies are monitored and reviewed for their effectiveness. 

 

The Sutton Trust research indicates that effective support comes from quality first teaching, improving feedback (a whole school focus), reduced class size, early intervention and extending the breadth of the curriculum. 

 

We aim to engage parents so that they know the progress that their child is making through regular reports and Parents’ Evenings. The needs analysis for the Pupil Premium is an ongoing process throughout a student’s education at The Rodillian Academy, which includes: 

  • Transition into the school 
  • Following the publication of school report data 
  • During Pastoral Education Plan meetings for ‘Children Looked After’ 
  • As part of a review of any other plan or provision. 

 

Furthermore, circumstances for individual students may change, meaning that a needs analysis results in some students becoming eligible for additional support, and a responsive approach is always necessary. 

 

At The Rodillian Academy we implement a range of strategies which support the students who qualify for the Pupil Premium Grant. No single intervention provides a complete solution to the complex educational needs of any school, and therefore our strategies are as individual as our students are.  Our overarching aim is to close the gap in achievement between those students who are eligible for FSM, LAC and Services Children and those who are not. 

 

The following examples outline just some of the ways we commit our Pupil Premium Funding to try and achieve our strategy goals: 

  • Provision of daily contact with form tutors who build relationships with members of their form.  In the case of remote learning, form tutors check in regularly both virtually and via the phone for pupils who are self-isolating. 
  • A specialist SEN Department who provide support for students with particular educational needs. 
  • Dedicated members of the pastoral team who support and nurture; including vulnerable students. 
  • A Senior Pastoral Worker who supports our most challenging students. 
  • 1:1 support and intervention for all students who require it. 
  • Small group intervention and support for all students who require it, including a comprehensive intervention strategy during holidays, weekends and before and after school for examination groups and, in 2022, some KS3 students. 
  • A curriculum under constant review which is designed to offer maximum flexibility to meet the needs of individuals. 
  • A broad and varied enrichment programme that offers outside of the classroom opportunities. 
  • Constant staff development and training to ensure that all staff in school are able to take responsibility for disadvantaged pupils’ outcomes and raise their expectations of what they can achieve. 
  • Leadership from two designated members of the Senior Leadership Team. 

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Challenges 

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils. 

Challenge number  Detail of challenge  
1  Gaps between disadvantaged students’ reading ages across KS3 have developed more significantly than in pre-Covid years. Assessments on entry in Year 7 and throughout Year 8 indicate that the gap in reading age has widened. Research by The Literacy Trust identified that many disadvantaged students reported the conditions of lockdown meant that some children have faced greater barriers to reading, including a lack of quiet space at home and a lack of home / peer support. This had negatively affected their ability to read and their motivation to read for enjoyment.  
2  The attainment of disadvantaged pupils is generally lower than that of their peers across English and Maths in recent PPE’s. The impact of remote learning had a far greater negative impact on disadvantaged students than on non-disadvantaged students. This observation is backed by a number of National studies including a project undertaken by the Nuffield Foundation. 

Gaps in learning and skills are more significant in disadvantaged students as identified through diagnostic analysis of PPE’s completed in September 2021. 

3  The attainment of disadvantaged pupils is generally lower than that of their peers across EBAC subjects in recent PPE’s. The impact of remote learning had a far greater negative impact on disadvantaged students than on non-disadvantaged students. This observation is backed by a number of national studies including a project undertaken by the Nuffield Foundation. 

Gaps in learning and skills are more significant in disadvantaged students as identified through diagnostic analysis of PPE’s completed by Year 11 and highlight a 0.22 progress gap. 

4  Our attendance data indicates that the attendance of disadvantaged students is significantly lower than non-disadvantaged. 

Between September and December 2021, the attendance of disadvantaged pupils was 6.5% lower overall to their non-disadvantaged peers. For Year 11 students that gap is significantly more at 13.3%. 

For persistent absentees, again there is a gap of 19.2% which is consistent across all year groups (except Year 7). 

5  Through observations, pupil voice and discussions with students and their families we have identified many social and emotional issues that students face with regards to anxiety, depression and low self-esteem. There is a noticeable increase in the number of students presenting with these problems, with disadvantaged students being particularly affected. This in turn has affected their academic attainment. 

We currently have 71 students who require additional support with their social and emotional needs (37 of them disadvantaged) many of whom receive small group and one to one intervention with Inclusion Support Workers, counsellors and key workers. 

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Intended Outcomes  

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved. 

Intended outcome  Success criteria 
Improved reading ages among disadvantaged pupils when they move into KS4.  By the end of our 2024/25 strategy reading tests (NGRT) will demonstrate improved reading skills among disadvantaged students and their will be a smaller disparity between the reading ages / reading scores of disadvantaged and their non-disadvantaged peers. This impact will also be evident by teachers across the curriculum through engagement in lessons and work scrutiny.  
Improved attainment among disadvantaged pupils in maths and English at the end of KS4.  By the end of our 2024/25 strategy the gap between the attainment and progress of disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students will have narrowed in maths and English and more disadvantaged students will leave KS4 with both maths and English at a grade 4 and above.  

The Progress 8 score in maths and English for disadvantaged students will be improved. 

Improved attainment among disadvantaged pupils in EBAC subjects at the end of KS4. 

 

By the end of our 2024/25 strategy the gap between the attainment and progress of disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils will have narrowed in EBAC subjects and more disadvantaged students will leave KS4 with grades in EBAC subjects at grade 4 and above. 

The Progress 8 score in across EBAC subjects for disadvantaged students will be improved. 

To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils.  Sustained high attendance by 2024/25 demonstrated by: 

  • The overall absence rate for all pupils being in line or above national average and the attendance gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils is reduced. 
  • The percentage of pupils who are persistently absent is below national average and the gap between the persistent absence of disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged is narrowed. 
To achieve and sustain improved well-being for all pupils, including those who are disadvantaged.  Sustained high levels of wellbeing from 2024/25 demonstrated by: 

  • Qualitative data from student voice, student and parent surveys along with teacher, pastoral and SEND staff observations. 
  • A significant increase in participation in enrichment activities, particularly among disadvantaged students. 

 

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Activity in this Academic Year 

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above. 

Teaching (for example, CPD, Recruitment and Retention) 

Budgeted cost: £ 294048.55 

Activity  Evidence that supports this approach  Challenge number(s) addressed 
Enhancement of our Aspiration and Resilience curriculum.   Providing students in KS3 with the opportunity to enhance their wider school experience through the Aspiration and Resilience curriculum. This will develop their character, perseverance through difficult tasks and cultivate a resilient attitude to tackle adversity or hardship.  

https://www.stemminds.com/building-resilience-and-why-it-matters/ 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/aspiration-interventions 

 

1, 2, 3, 4, & 5  

 

School Trips   School trips can enhance the students’ cultural capital and support their understanding of key concepts in specific subject areas. School trips can also be used as an incentive to recognise good behaviour and attitude towards learning. School trips can enable students to learn new skills, build confidence and establish long lasting friendships.  

 

https://www.schooltravelorganiser.com/news-and-ideas/dfe-recognises-enormous-benefits-of-residentials-amid-hopes-for-easter-2021-restart/8914.article 

 

1, 2, 3,4 & 5 

 

Behaviour/SEND CPD for staff   Use of specific behaviour and SEND CPD for staff can enable staff to meet the needs of all students and develop their behaviour management toolkit with the aim of providing staff with the tools to de-escalate situations and ensure high expectations for all students across the academy.  

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/behaviour-interventions 

 

1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 

 

 

School Careers Advisor   We have employed our own Careers Advisor to enable our students to be provided with specific Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance (CIAG) in a timely manner, and provide extended opportunities to visit Russell Group universities by raising aspirations and self-efficacy.  

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/aspiration-interventions 

 

1, 2, 3, & 5 

 

RSE Guest Speakers and External Provisions   Provide a high-quality provision curriculum offer through external provisions that are quality assured. This will develop students’ social and emotional skills. It will provide them with the knowledge to keep themselves and others safe.  

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education 

 

5 

 

Managing the Student/ Teacher ratio   Provide students with more frequent interactions with their class teacher in literacy and numeracy for selected cohorts. 

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reducing-class-size 

 

1, 2 & 3 

 

Unifrog – Careers   An online platform to provide students with high quality pathways to progression beyond KS4.  

 

1, 2 & 3 

 

 

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Targeted Academic Support (for example, Tutoring, One-to-One Support Structured Interventions)  

Budgeted cost: £21271.98 

Activity  Evidence that supports this approach  Challenge number(s) addressed 
Extending the school day Initiatives:  

  • Structured period 7 lessons after school will be provided to Key Stage 4 students in Years 10 and 11.  
  • Saturday School/ Holiday School for a targeted cohort.  
  • Subject Masterclasses before school for a targeted cohort. 
  • Study Club for KS3 and KS4.  
Extending the school day involves increasing the learning time for selected students to enable them to consolidate their learning beyond the classroom. This will include revision sessions, masterclasses before school and period 7 sessions. Sessions are well structured which links to the curriculum. Attendance and engagement will be closely monitored. 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/extending-school-time 

 

1, 2, 3 & 4 

 

Reading Comprehension Strategies   Providing students with the opportunity to enhance their literacy skills through targeted Rise and Read cohorts at KS3. Reading programmes and timetabled sessions such as Accelerated Reader can also support students’ literacy skills.  

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies 

 

1, 2 & 3 

 

 

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Wider strategies (for example, related to Attendance, Behaviour, Wellbeing) 

Budgeted cost: £ 57890 

Activity  Evidence that supports this approach  Challenge number(s) addressed 
Enrichment Activities for KS3 and KS4 students.  

 

Sports activities and Arts participation.  

Providing students with the opportunity to express themselves within and beyond the curriculum through our enrichment offer. This can enable students to develop their links between other aspects of the curriculum and support student wellbeing.  

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/arts-participation 

 

1, 2, 4 & 5 

 

School Counsellor and Family Support Worker Role: Mentoring   Mentoring allows students to build relationships, confidence, resilience, and character. It provides the students with emotional support through regular structured intervention and support.  

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/mentoring 

 

5 

 

Pastoral and SEND Support   Mentoring allows students to build relationships, confidence, resilience, and character. It provides the students with emotional support through regular structured intervention and support.  

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/mentoring 

 

5 

 

Attendance and Welfare Officers (AWO)  Our AWO’s work closely with families and individual students to provide welfare support and improve attendance for all students through fostering excellent relationships with students and parents. AWO’s identify a specific cohort to work closely with to provide a more structured programme of support which is tracked over a period of time.  

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/framework-for-securing-full-attendance-actions-for-schools-and-local-authorities 

 

4 & 5  

 

Rewards/Incentives linked to Progress, Attendance and Behaviour.   We have a variety of rewards initiatives that take place over the academic year. We believe rewards can act as an incentive to motivate students to enable them to develop their character and progress well in school. https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/guidance-reports/behaviour 

 

1, 2, 3 & 4 

 

Breakfast Clubs – Strength and Conditioning   Providing selected students with the opportunity to learn about healthy lifestyles and provide breakfast to ensure they have a good start to the day.  

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/guidance-reports/behaviour 

 

1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 373210.53 

 

Part B: Review of Outcomes in the Previous Academic Year 

Pupil Premium Strategy Outcomes 

This details the impact that our Pupil Premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 – 2021 academic year.  

Internal assessments across 2020/21 demonstrate that the attainment gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged for students achieving 4+ and 5+ in both English and maths had increased by 9% at 4+ and 25% at 5+. The Progress 8 gap however had reduced by 0.68. 

The factors affecting the outcomes of our disadvantaged students were significantly amplified due to the impact of the pandemic. The strategies we planned to put in place to increase attainment and progress of our disadvantaged students were not possible in all cases. This was particularly the case with regards to our wave one intervention strategies, in class teaching and learning pedagogical approaches, and our additional intervention plans.  

Our attendance of disadvantaged students in 2020/21 is only slightly lower than in 2018/2019 (pre Covid). Current data suggests that attendance of disadvantaged students is 1.1% lower today than in 2019. It is still however lower than national and we will be building on an approach to improve this going forward with our 2021/22 – 2024/25 Pupil Premium Strategy. 

During the pandemic there was a significant increase of referrals from teachers and staff to our Special Needs Department regarding the social and emotional well-being of our students. The number of referrals and concerns raised by parents also increased. Over 52% of the students with SEMH needs (that we have supported this year) are disadvantaged. Again, this year a principal focus of our strategy to support our disadvantaged pupils is to address the needs of our students’ social and emotional well-being.  

Externally provided programmes 

Programme  Provider 
Reading programme for KS3  Accelerated Reader 
Online maths platform  Mathswatch 
Literacy Skills Programme  Lexia 
GCSE Revision materials for 28 subjects with tracking tool  GCSE Pod / Near Pod 

 

Service Pupil Premium Funding (optional) 

For schools that receive this funding, you may wish to provide the following information:  

Measure  Details  
How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?  N/A 
What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?  N/A 

 

 

Further information  

 2021 Pupil Premium Information

 

The Rodillian Academy