Sociology

Department Information

 

Year 9:

Pre-Option Sociology is an option for students to take. This acts as an introduction for all who are interested in doing Sociology at GCSE or just intrigued by the subject.

Autumn term

Students learn key concepts within Sociology such as socialisation, society, norms and values, social change and social control. They also investigate Sociological theories about society, gaining an understanding of Functionalism, Marxism and Feminism.

Spring term

Students investigate what shapes our behaviour, looking into the power the media holds over us, how people respond to different pressures and labels given out by other members of society. Students will gain an understanding through looking at existing studies and investigating the cause of the 2011 London Riots.

Summer term

Once students understand the factors of society that shape our behaviour, we investigate what makes people misbehave. Investigating how social change occurs through protests, how successful protests are and trialling several forms of protest for themselves.

Building on their knowledge of society the students explore contemporary issues that exist in our society today and create their own society with its own set of norms and values.

Year 10 (Two Year Course):

GCSE Sociology is an optional GCSE that students may wish to take. It is assessed in 2 examinations, both with equal weighting. It is 100% exam.

For each topic area students are asked to critically evaluate and compare and contrast theories or explanations, including the key features of each theory or explanation in the context of a specific topic and area of sociology.

Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sociological theories by reading and responding to extracts which illustrate the different views of sociologists. They should be able to critically analyse and evaluate how the issues have been interpreted by these sociologists.

Summer term

Students learn key concepts within Sociology such as socialisation, society, norms and values, social change, and social control.

Autumn term

Students investigate Sociological theories about society, gaining an understanding of Functionalism, Marxism and Feminism.

Topics: For each topic area students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of relevant methods and methodological issues, for example the use of official statistics, qualitative and quantitative approaches and the use of mixed methods.

They will explore and debate contemporary social issues in order to be able to challenge everyday understandings of social phenomena from a sociological perspective. The knowledge, understanding and skills they develop will provide a basis for further study and career choices.

Students start ‘The Sociological Approach’ (Unit 1). This section of the course students learn about;

  • debates within sociology including conflict versus consensus
  • how sociological knowledge and ideas change over time and how these ideas inform our understanding of the social world
  • the contextualised work (a sense of time and place) of key classical sociologists Durkheim, Marx and Weber referencing both their view of the world and their contribution to the development of the discipline
  • different sociological perspectives on social structures, social processes and social issues, including those informed by: feminism, functionalism, interactionism and Marxism as specified in the topics listed below and key arguments (identified through reading and responding to extracts from key sociological texts)
  • the interrelationship between the core areas of sociology
  • how to use sociological research methods as outlined in the topics and how they apply in the specified contexts ie families, education, crime and deviance, social stratification. Teachers may encourage their students to undertake small-scale research projects in order to develop their understanding of the practical difficulties faced by the sociologists working in the field
  • key sociological terms and concepts concerned with social structures, social processes and social issues and the explanation of social phenomena including: society, socialisation, norms, values, roles, labelling, discrimination, power and authority.

Students are assessed at the end of each topic by completing exam questions.

Towards the end of this term students will start studying Families.

During the teaching of ‘Families’ students learn about:

  • Family types that exist in the UK today
  • Functions of family according to Functionalists
  • Functions of the family according to Marxists
  • Changes in divorce in UK since 1945 – Patterns
  • Changes in divorce in UK since 1945 – Law
  • Changes in fertility
  • Changes in life expectancy
  • Changes in relationships between men and women, and parents & children

Spring term

Students will finish studying families and will be assessed at the end of topic by completing exam questions.

Students will then go onto study Education. During the teaching of ‘Education’ students learn about:

  • Educational policy both past and present
  • The structure of education today
  • Differences in education and achievement by gender, class and ethnicity
  • The different factors that influence achievement such as material and cultural deprivation, teacher labelling and student subcultures.
  • The function of education according to functionalists
  • The function of education according to Marxists

Students are assessed at the end of each topic by completing exam questions.

At the end of teaching Unit 1 (Studying Society, Education and Families) students will sit a mock exam for this unit.

Year 11 (Two Year Course):

GCSE Sociology is an optional GCSE that students may wish to take. It is assessed in 2 examinations, both with equal weighting. It is 100% exam.

Summer term

In this academic year students will start learning unit 2 (Crime and Deviance, Mass Media, and Social Inequality).

For the summer term students will start learning about ‘Crime and Deviance’. During the teaching of ‘Crime and Deviance’ students learn about:

  • The difference between crime and deviance
  • The difference between formal and informal rules
  • Explanations of crime according to biology, psychology and sociology, looking into subcultural causes, crime as a result of labelling, and as relative deprivation as a cause of crime.

Autumn term

At the beginning of the Autumn term students complete their learning of ‘Crime and Deviance’ (unit 2), learning about:

  • Official statistics on crime and the dark figure of crime.
  • How Sociologists study crime through victim surveys, such as the British Crime Survey and self report studies.
  • How crime is distributed through society by age, gender, social class, ethnicity and locality.
  • We also explore contemporary social problems that exist within society today such as Youth Crime and Racism.

 At the end of the topic students are assessed by completing exam questions.

Towards the end of the Autumn term students will start learning about ‘Social Stratification’ (unit 2). In their learning of ‘Social Stratification’ students learn about:

  • Different views of the functionalist theory of social stratification.
  • The work of Davis and Moore on social stratification from a functionalist perspective.

Spring term

Students will complete their learning of ‘Social Stratification’ (unit 2). In their learning of ‘Social Stratification’ students learn about:

  • Different views of socio-economic class.
  • The work of Marx and Weber on socio-economic class.
  • Different views on factors affecting life chances.
  • The work of Devine revisiting the idea of the affluent worker

Finally students will revise for Unit 1 (Studying Society, Families and Education) and Unit 2 (Crime and Deviance, Social Stratification) exams.

Departmental Staff:

Miss A Williams –  Head of Sociology [email protected]

Support Your Child – Useful links and advice:

Follow the department on twitter @SocRodillian

www.podology.org.uk

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/sociology

Revise with department made quizzes on www.memrise.com (see your teacher for the link)

Stay up to date with current events http://www.bbc.co.uk/news

The Rodillian Academy